To get back into the flow of publishing my thoughts I’ve decided to put a little bit of social pressure on myself. So this one is the first of four posts (aka a mini series) inspired by an Inside Intercom podcast called “Best Practices in Product“. Stay tuned for the remaining three…

“Jobs-to-be-done” thinking when launching new digital workplace services.

Bob Moesta (President of the ReWired Group and Jobs-to-be-Done architect) says in the podcast interview:

There’s actually no new consumption. They’re already getting the job done one way or another through a different category. (…) They always switch from something.

In corporate environments this is very much the reality every single time. I haven’t met one single organisation that would tick off statements like

  • At our company we don’t collaborate.
  • We don’t have any internal communication.
  • People here have no idea what we do or what we have done.
  • Our experts aren’t connected and we operate like lone wolfs.
  • We can’t produce positive business results because of IT.

Whenever I was allowed to work with people in transformational and change projects, the key driver was to make people’s life easier so they have more time for…

  • client interaction
  • innovation
  • knowledge management and re-use
  • social interaction & networking

It’s about relieving people from unnecessary effort. It’s about allowing people to be effective with their own resource, which might be an intrinsic motivator for the audience you really want to reach: the high performers.

Giving people options that are better than today’s way of doing things is not enough in the corporate context.

The reality is that there’s no more time in the world. You can’t create time, and so now they’re choosing to do Snapchat and not do something else. (…)

… Bob says in the context of explaining the effect of substituting one social media service by one that gets introduced later and triggers a particular user need or preference.

I keep experiencing the effect that potentially better options stay untouched or only occasionally used. From an outside angle the newly proposed enablement of individual or collaborative productivity seems a “no brainer”. The people, however, decide to stick to the old – cumbersome, time consuming but comfortably familiar – ways of getting things done.

In companies a new reference point, a new motivator, drives adoption – not a new tool.

The only way to address this is to change the context work is done in. This immediately becomes a leadership and management task. In order to guide people into new, ideally more effective ways of working, they need new motivators. The meaning of “jobs-to-be-done” has to change in order to allow people to evaluate the newly introduced option differently.

For example: if “capture the minutes of the kick-off” is the “job-to-be-done”, there will be almost no motivation to adapt new collaborative tools, that would at the same time help to manage task, track progress etc.. The new (and enforced) focus has to be “use the follow-up session to give feedback on results and progress and decide next steps based on our learning“. That way it’s clear, that attending the next meeting will require “being on the same page” and “transparency for how we’ve moved things based on the kick-off” (aka preparation…and when have you last been in a well prepared meeting?!). The minutes themselves won’t be very useful. Only the actions triggered by the kick-off, the individual contribution, and how things stand before the group re-gathers is now relevant. The minutes become merely the “documentation of our joint foundation”.

So when you work on introducing new digital services for your employees, it definitely makes sense to think about the motivators of adoption and change. Guide people into the new world of increased productivity and make them experience what it means to “get-the-new-job-done”, the one that makes us all better and more successful.

***

Next time: Telling your product’s story – why change management needs a solid, thought through and resonating story line for the people that are supposed to change.

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